Records of LT staff who fought in WW1 available

The junction of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road in 1927. (Stockholm Transport Museum)

Genealogy website Ancestry is making available some 35,000 records regarding London Transport staff who went to fight in the First World War. These include the tragic tale of a 19-year-old conductor who died on the first day of The Battle of the Somme.

These fascinating records help us remember the stories of the men and women who got Londoners from A to B every day…

Occupations within London Transport of those chronicled are wide and varied, and include porters, cleaners, platelayers, and signal box boys. The records cover the period 1863 to 1931. Incidentally, it was in 1863 that the first underground railway opened in the world: The Metropolitan Railway in London.

Ancestry’s senior content manager Miriam Silverman said: “These fascinating records help us remember the stories of the men and women who got Londoners from A to B every day, from the infancy of public transport in London in the 1800s to the early 20th century.

“But they’re also a source of important historical information about the First World War, workplace diversity and the day-to-day lives of normal people.”

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